Limavady street names from the past

LIMAVADY STREET NAMES FROM THE PAST:

Limavady was known as Newtownlimavady until 1870 when the council decided to officially shorten the name. 

The new town of Limavady was a plantation settlement built by the servitor Sit Thomas Phillips who was given a large estate in the Roe valley in 1610. Phillips had settled at the old O'Cahan stronghold at Limavady on the banks of the River Roe. He decided to build a new plantation town a mile further downstream, which he called Newtowne. Raven's map of 1622 shows 'Sir Thomas Phillips buildinge at Newtowne, a mile from Limna Vadde, a village of 18 small houses, at a cross roads, with a stone cross at the centre''. 

Up until the time of the famine Limavady remained a relatively small town with essentially four main streets. The town grew substantially with the post-famine influx and as a result new houses and streets were constructed to meet the growing demand. New streets and new names came into existence.

This is a survey of the names and places that I have come across in researching the history of the town from the seventeenth century from a variety of sources:

Newtowne Limavady 1622
Limavady map 1699:
Market Street
Later renamed Main Street
Patterson’s Lane
Later renamed Methodist Lane
Market House Lane
Later renamed Market Street
The Green
Later renamed Catherine Street
Pound Lane
Later renamed Protestant Street

1735 lease
Cuckold Row
Was on the east side of the present Linenhall Street.

Ordnance Survey Memoirs, 1833-35
Name of Street
Number of houses
Main Street
94
Catherine Street
64
Linen Hall Street
33
Market House Lane
25
Ballyclose
141
Irish Green Street
69
Isle of Man
44
Pound Lane
29

Note – there was a street named Captain  Street in the 1831 townland valuation – today it is the upper end of Roe Mill Road. This road ran parallel to Pound Lane (today known as Protestant Street). See below:

Captain Street, Limavady

 GREAT CHURCH OF THE ROE (Phillip Donnelly)
Placenames in the register of St. Mary’s catholic registers at the time of Fr Edward McKenna (1857-1869)
Bessbrook
Methodist Lane
Brewery Road
Moss Knock
Barony March
New Coleraine Road
Brick Row
Peter’s Brae
Cather’s Row
Pound Lane
Distillery Road
Rankin’s Row
Isle of Man
St Patrick’s Court
Kennaught Street
Sandy Row
Little Dublin
Steel’s Houses
Lory Lane
Town Hall Court

Coleraine Chronicle BMD's (1844-1869)
Placename
Year
Barley Park
1854
Walk Mills
1859
Bridge Street
1861
Ball Court
1862
Bridge Hill
1864
Brick Row
1869
Railway Row
1869
Railway Place
1869
Pound Loaning
1869

T.H Mullin, Limavady and the Roe Valley 
  • Barley Park – built in 1813 by Wm. Ross and skirting of trees planted. Later used by Technical school for domestic economy and later demolished. East of Irish Green Street.
  • Bridge Hill – Original house built at Bridge Hill built 1732. Bridge Hill became the War memorial Building, was damaged by a bomb in the troubles and demolished 1974.
LIMAVADY STREET NAMES PAST AND PRESENT
Back Row
Near the end of Protestant Street and William Street
Barley Park House
Top of Connell Street where part of Limavady High School is now built
Brick Row
First half of Killane Road
Bridge Hill
Top of Catherine street at Roe Bridge
Coach Road
Top of Ballyclose Street adjoining onto Church Street
Council Terrace
Houses at centre of Church Street on the site of Cather’s old distillery (built 1933)
Craig’s Court
Lower Irish Green Street behind Moore Lockhead’s shop
Distillery Road
Church Street
The Double Ditch
Replaced by the Rathbrady Road linking Irish Green to Roe Mill.
McCrory’s Lane
Just off Main Street and Ballyclose Street
Meeting House Lane
By the side of the Post Office, Main Street
Methodist Lane
Renamed Connell Street (the bottom of Connell Street on the right side)
Rathbrady Cottages
On Roe Mill Road at the end of Rathbrady
Sam’s Lane or Factory Lane
Side and behind Council Terrace
Scappy’s corner
Main Coleraine Road (Broad Road)
Spring Hill
Top of Catherine Street and start of Roe Mill Road
Sunnyfield Terrace
Where houses are now built in Connell Street
St. Patrick’s Court
Connell Street behind St. Pat’s Hall
The New Row
William Street
Windsor Avenue
In 1937/8 the council built 14 semi-detached houses on the opposite side of Church Street.

 LIMAVADY STREET NAMES IN THE 1901 AND 1911 CENSUS RETURNS
1901 CENSUS

1911 CENSUS


Street name 1901
Number
Street name 1911
Number
Order
Ballyclose Street
1-65
Ballyclose Street
1-68
1
Billy’s Lane (Josephine Avenue)
1-11
No Billy’s lane listed
n/a
n/a
Catherine Street
1-66
Catherine Street
1-66
2
Distillery Road
1-33
Distillery Road
1-34
4
Fleming’s Court
1-12
Fleming’s Court
1-12
5
Irish Green Street
1-103
Irish Green Street
1-109
6
Isle of Man Street
1-45
Isle of Man Street
1-45
7
No Josephine Avenue listed
n/a
Josephine Avenue (Billy’s Lane)
1-20
8
Kennaught Street
1-40
Kennaught Street
1-46
9
Linenhall Street
1-42
Linenhall Street
1-41
10
Main Street
1-95
Main Street
1-101
11
Market House Street
1-44
Market House Street
1-46
12
Meeting House Lane
1-7
Meeting House Lane
1-7
13
Methodist Lane
1-25
Methodist Lane
1-21
14
Mill Row
1-8
Mill Row
1-8
15
Protestant Street
1-36
Protestant Street
1-33
16
Roe Mill Street (Road)
1-37
Roe Mill Road
1-31
17
Sandy Row
1-11
Sandy Row
1-10
18
Steel’s Row
1-28
Steel’s Row
1-8
3
William Street
1-12
William Street
1-12
19

 1904 Map of Limavady
ROEVILLE (TERRACE)

North of Christchurch, close to the creamery and west of the railway line were 2 rows of 4 houses called Roeville. This was the most northern terrace in the town – also known as Creamery Lane
CHURCH VIEW (TERRACE)

A row of 8 houses running South from the centre of Ballyclose Street
DISTILLERY ROAD
At the eastern end of Ballyclose Street, Distillery road ran in a South-east direction to Scroggy Lane
SCROGGY LANE
A narrow lane that ran from the eastern end of Distillery Road in a southerly direction past Scroggy House to the Greystone road.
IRISH GREEN STREET
Ran in a southerly direction from Market Street down to the Double Ditch.
KENNAGHT STREET
Ran south of Irish Green from the Double Ditch past Josephine Avenue
JOSEPHINE AVENUE
Ran from the Roe Mill Road to Kennaght Street
DOUBLE DITCH
Ran from Irish Green Street to the Roe Mill road – later replaced by the Rathbrady Road.
ISLE OF MAN STREET
Ran from the western end of Catherine Street in a southerly direction to the Double Ditch and then became Roe Mill Road.
ROE MILL ROAD
Ran south of Isle of Man Street from the Double Ditch and further south became Coolesan.
PROTESTANT STREET
Ran from Catherine Street down to William Street and after this was called Pound Lane
POUND LANE
Ran from William Street to the Double Ditch
WILLIAM STREET
Ran from Isle of Man Street to Protestant Street at Drumachose old school

 Street names and dates from newspapers before WW2
Churchill Terrace
1877
Coleraine Chronicle
Albert Terrace
1886
Northern Constitution
Steel’s Terrace
1895
Derry Journal
Moore Terrace
1897
Coleraine Chronicle
Oakey’s Terrace
1914
Larne Times
Council Terrace
1934
Derry Journal
Factory Terrace
1936
Derry Journal
Hunter’s Terrace
1938
Londonderry Sentinel
Alexander Terrace
1938
Derry Journal

STREETS - POST WW2
Massey Avenue
24 houses built by Council between 1943 and 1946 and named after William Ferguson Massey, Limavady born PM of New Zealand
Crawford Square
28 homes built 1948-1949 and named for David and John Crawford of Parkersburg, West Virginia, founders of the Parkersburg Rig & Reel Company.
Connell Street
Built 1954-1955 and called for the Connell family
Roeview Park
64 houses built 1958-1958
Scroggy Park
16 houses built 1962
Rathbeg Estate
Hospital lane. First phase built 1962-1963 and second phase built 1963-1964
Rathbeg Walk
Overlooking Scroggy road Playing fields built 1972-1973
Alexander Road
Built 1967-1972
Oakey’s Row
Demolished 1971-1972 and new houses numbered into Irish Green Street
Annadale Park
Facing Massey Avenue houses, finished by N.I.H.E in 1972
Thackeray Place
Pensioners’ houses built 1972-1973
Killane Road/Church Street
Started by the council and completed by N.I.H.E

Erected by Northern Ireland Housing Trust
Greystone Park

Josephine Avenue
Completed 1966-1967
Protestant Street/William Street
Redeveloped 1968-1970

THE TURKEY ROW:
On the right hand side of the Sistrakeel Road, about 100 yards from the turn off on the main Ballykelly-Derry road, there is a very large oak tree. There used to be a line of six of these trees, four of which have been cut down or died over the years. They were TURKISH OAKS, which of course could be called the Turkey Row.
                                          
THE DYE WORKS:
Still called ‘The Dye Works’ to this day.
This came because all cottagers used to burn nothing but peat on their fires. When they threw their ashes out over the years, people, chickens, ducks, dogs etc became covered in red, and so the nickname ‘The Dye Works’ came into being.

ALBERT TERRACE
Late Victorian row of houses in Linenhall Street























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